Nectarines

The nectarine is a rounded fruit with a single central groove. Its smooth skin is blushed with hues of ruby, pink and gold throughout. The flesh is perfumed with aromatics, overtly juicy when ripe, and golden colored with red bleeds at the skin and surrounding the central rough pit. A ripe nectarine’s texture is soft with a melting quality, its flavors balanced with layers both bright and sweet. 

Treat Obesity

Nectarines may prove useful in a condition of obesity and its associated complications. Research studies have shown that stone fruits such as nectarines contain bioactive compounds such as anthocyanins, catechin, chlorogenic acid and quercetin derivatives which have the potential to combat obesity-related medical conditions like diabetes and cardiac disorders. The anti-obesity and anti-diabetic qualities may work against the metabolic syndrome and decrease the oxidation of bad cholesterol, which is implicated in obesity-related heart diseases.   

Improve vision

Nectarines contain lutein, an important nutrient which encourages eye health and helps reduce the risk of a disease like age-related macular degeneration. Various investigative researchers have shown that lutein is also an extremely powerful antioxidant which helps in reducing the risk of nuclear cataract. Lutein dwells in the macular pigment of the eye and assists in protecting the retinal tissues from the damage caused by oxidative stress and high-wavelength light.

Skin Care

Bioflavonoids present in the fruit contributes productively in the skin care. Anti-oxidative components such as vitamin C, lutein and beta- carotene found in nectarines take up the credit for such defensive effect. Beta-carotene, which is a precursor of vitamin A, is instrumental in exerting protective action against the skin damage caused by the exposure to UV radiations.

 

Nectarines are available during late spring and summer. 

A nectarine seed is considered highly inedible as it can contain high levels of poisonous hydrogen cyanide. This toxin is readily detected by its bitter taste. The fruit of nectarine has high levels of beta-carotene, calcium, and vitamin C. Herbalists use the branches and leaves of nectarine trees as a demulcent, for stomach disorders.

Documentation of the first nectarine was recorded in English in 1616. As peaches are native to central Asia, though, there is geographical speculation that the first nectarine was found growing on a peach tree within the same region and trade routes brought it to Europe in the 15th century. Genetic studies have concluded that nectarines are created due to a recessive allele. Without two copies of a gene, specific genetic traits will not be inherited. Thus, the nectarine naturally evolved as a fuzz-free peach.